International Forum of Teaching and Studies (IFOTS)
ISSN 1555-872X

International Forum of Teaching and Studies (IFOTS) provides an academic exchange forum for scholars, educators, and professionals to disseminate research on theory building and practice-based information on education. This peer-reviewed journal publishes biannually and particularly dedicates to the development and improvement of teaching within international contexts since 2004.

Library of Congress Web site

Current Issue Vol. 18 No 1, 2022

Author

Dr. Gabriele Strohschen, a native of Berlin (FRG), completed her studies at Northern Illinois University in Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. She worked in Chicago's historically disenfranchised communities until joining joined DePaul University as director for the graduate programs at the School for New Learning in 2003. Dr. Strohschen conducted action research, program design and evaluation, and teacher training in Germany, Czech Republic, Kenya, China, Mexico, Thailand, and around the USA. In Afghanistan, she completed a program evaluation project for the Afghan Ministry of Education’s Women Literacy Project, funded by UNESCO, with Dr. Elazier. Retired from DePaul University with the title of professor emerita, she collaborates with community residents, organizations, institutions of higher education, students, artists, and activists in social justice projects, virtually around the world and locally at her Pilsen Storefront in Chicago. She provides program and resource development along with teacher training services and is currently spearheading the development of an international advocacy and training institute for the education of adults. “Dr. G.” has been working with American Scholars Press since its inception. Email: gstrohsc@depaul.edu

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Author

Vincent Wiggins is Dean of Career and Continuing Education Programs at Harry S Truman College, City Colleges of Chicago.  Previously he served as Dean of Instruction at Harold Washington College in Chicago, where he worked with faculty and staff to support students’ academic success. One of his current focus areas is looking at relevant education and programming to support students’ academic goals that align with desired career goals.  Dr. Wiggins completed his Doctor of Education in Curriculum Design at DePaul University.  His research focuses on students’ academic success in higher education by using instructional technology and self-directed learning. Dr. Wiggins is certified in Adult Education, Professional Leadership Training, IT Project Management, and Six Sigma.  As a Master Online Teacher (MOT) and Certified Online Learning Administrator (COLA), Dr. Wiggins’ commitment to education includes researching multiple delivery modes for learning that include hybrid and online learning. In his roles in management and as an educator, he has developed various training programs and facilitated workshops for students, faculty, and staff.  He has presented on pedagogy, andragogy, and technology at professional conferences, including the American Association of Adult and Continuing Education (AAACE), the International Society for Self-Directed Learning, and The Mentoring Institute at the University of New Mexico – Albuquerque. He can be reached at wiggins.vincent@gmail.com

Abstract

This article focuses on the current learning environment in Career and Technical Education programs often offered in Community Colleges and how these are impacted by the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. It explores how historical challenges require community college involvement in educational equity by being committed to the obligation gap. Obligation gap by definition, “calls out the institution, not the student, to be the prime agent of change (Sims et al. 2020, p. 36). Historical references are provided to assist in understanding what needs to be considered in moving forward during the pandemic and develop new learning environments that will assist afterwards.

Keywords

equity gap, community college, career and technical education, pandemic, self-efficacy

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Author

Rona Robinson-Hill, Ph.D., an African American woman, is Assistant Professor in the Department of Biology at Ball State University. A science educator, she is the principal investigator of the BSU Training Future Scientist (TFS) Program. In that capacity she leads the development of pedagogical strategies for the K-12 science methods courses she teaches at BSU; recruiting and supervising TFS Ambassadors, BSU undergraduates and high-school juniors and seniors to work in STEM research labs during the summer; and coordinating STEM “Shadow-A-Scientist” research experiences for secondary education majors each spring in her secondary science methods course. Her research focuses on how to effectively prepare pre-service teachers (PSTs) for the diverse underserved groups US schools serve though an immersive learning experience, working in collaboration with Dr. Rebecca Brown. rmrobinsonhi@bsu.edu

Rebecca D. Brown, Ed.D. is Assistant Teaching Professor in the Department of Elementary Education in the Teacher’s College at Ball State University. She has served both as an elementary and middle school science teacher in several diverse settings, as well a principal in a K-8 school. Her research focuses on equitable grading practices, culturally relevant and responsive teaching, and the impact of familial addiction on student learning. Her research focuses on how to effectively prepare pre-service teachers (PSTs) for the diverse underserved groups US schools serve though an immersive learning experience, working in collaboration with Dr. Rona Robinson. rdbrown2@bsu.edu.

Abstract

This article describes the Training Future Scientist program which was developed in partnership with the eNVsion program for a Professional Development School (PDS). It resulted in creating a unique environment for pre-service teachers (PSTs) to enhance their instructional skills in elementary science education classes. Though specialized approaches to traditional practicum courses, this partnership between a Midwest university and a local school district provided an opportunity for innovative teaching approaches, applicable for university and elementary school faculty, elementary education PSTs, and elementary students. This experiential project included courses in instructional and behavioral engagement, literacy practices and instructional methods for elementary science course. This article describes key features of the training program and its results, based on feedback collected university faculty, PSTs, and PDS students.

Keywords

pre-service teacher training, professional development school, immersive, literacy, instructional and behavioral engagement, science instructional methods, training future scientist

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Author

Pi-Chi Han is associate professor at National Kaohsiung Normal University in Taiwan. Formerly, she was an assistant professor in the Division of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies at University of Missouri-St. Louis (UMSL) and also a visiting scholar at Chinese Academy of Social Science in China. Currently she serves as a senior advisor to Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) in HRD Working Group and Policy Partnership on Women and the Economy. She is a scholar-practitioner in the field of intercultural HRD, an adult educator of global workforce development, and a consultant of global talent development. Her research and publications have focused on intercultural effectiveness (ICE) competencies, cross-cultural mentoring, global leadership development, Confucian leadership, and women’s leadership development. She has been certified as a Trainer of Trainers for the Developing Diversity Training for the Workplace by George Washington University and Global Art Markets Collecting and Connoisseurship by Sotheby’s Institute of Art. She conducted intercultural workshop in Spain, China, and Taiwan. pichihan@gmail.com

Abstract

The novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic is posing an immense challenge to humanity. The need to develop intercultural competencies has become challenging and received extensive attention. The quest to develop intercultural effectiveness (ICE) competencies is on the rise. However, it has been a lack of theoretical justification for conceptualizing the developmental strategies of attaining ICE. This article connects the Theory of Transformative Learning (TL) with a sequence of processes to pave a developmental pathway for developing ICE. It helps adult learning and HRD professionals in planning, developing, and conducting training programs for the improvement of ICE.

Keywords

novel coronavirus (COVID-19), intercultural effectiveness (ICE) competencies, theory of transformative learning, adult learning, human resource development (HRD)

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Author

Andrea Yelin attended Vassar College and graduated from Rice University with a B.A. in history. After college, Andrea earned a J.D. and M.S.L.S. from Case Western University. For many years, Andrea taught Legal Writing for 1st year law students and Advanced Legal Research for upper-level law students at Loyola University Chicago School of Law. She is the author of Contract Law for Legal Professionals, as well as the co-author of Basic Legal Writing, and The Legal Research and Writing Handbook which will be published in the 9th edition in 2022. Currently, Andrea is an adjunct faculty member at DePaul University in Chicago where she teaches undergraduates in the Writing, Rhetoric & Discourse department and in the School of Continuing and Professional Studies. ayelin@depaul.edu

Abstract

In this article, the author provides instructors with a concrete strategy to reach the range of students in a first-term college writing course. A model assignment and sample essays to illustrate clear methods to analyze the large-scale organization in an essay are presented in detail. This model is an example of how to sensitize students to small scale writing concerns. The goal of this approach is to guide students in building confidence in their abilities to navigate a college writing assignment, with concrete examples, while walking through all the steps in the process.

Keywords

freshmen writing, rubrics, models, structured instructional methods

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Author

Frederick V. Engram Jr. is Assistant Professor of Instruction at the University of Texas-Arlington in the Department of Criminology/Criminal Justice and the Center for African American Studies. Dr. Engram also has an affiliate faculty appointment with the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. He holds an EdD in Higher Education Administration from Northeastern University. Dr. Engram is a qualitative researcher who grounds his work in critical race theory which he uses to make sense of the African American experience with racism in higher education and the criminal justice system. Dr. Engram is known as being a disruptor of oppressive systems. His work can be found in media outlets such as Blavity, Forbes, and Diverse Issues in Higher Education. Dr. Engram is a widely requested keynote speaker and all requests should be submitted through his website www.drfrederickengramjr.com. Connect with Dr. Engram via Twitter @VanCarlito2003 or Instagram @dr.engram19.  frederick.engram@uta.edu 

Abstract

Anti-Blackness in education is not a siloed issue. It is pervasive in every part of society and the world. As Black male educators we are often forced into disciplinary roles as a means of enforcing the social control of Black youth. Guided by the understanding of patriarchy and white manning as core concepts Black male educators must fight back in hopes of disrupting the status-quo. This article will examine how Black male educators express themselves via social media in ways that are not conducive to the positive uplift of Black youth. It will also explore how deficit-framed pedagogical practices which create the idea that Black children are unteachable--requires disruption. The article will conclude with encouraging Black male educators to provide an intersectional-feminist lens to understand how to disrupt anti-Blackness in education and uplift Black boy and girlhood.

Keywords

white manning, school-to-prison pipeline, anti-blackness, anti-racism, spirit-murdering, misogynoir

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Author

Carmela Ochoa is the Coordinator of ABE/ASE at Moraine Valley Community College in Palos Hills, IL. She became a passionate advocate for adult learners after beginning her career in the Adult Education Program. As a single mother pursuing her Associates Degree, she recognized that adult students had different needs than traditional college students. Intent on gaining as much knowledge as possible, she decided to register in an undergrad program that focused on Academic Advising and Career Coaching for Adult students in Higher Education. She received her M.A. in Educating Adults from DePaul University – School for New Learning to further her understanding of assisting adult learners pursue their academic goals. Currently, she serves as acting Director for the Commission on Adult Basic Education and Literacy (CABEL) with the American Association for Adult and Continuing Education (AAACE). Carmela is a doctoral student in Global Leadership at DePaul University. ochoa@morainevalley.edu

Abstract

This article explores the experiences of Latinas’ journey in education as a student and professional educator. From my examined personal experiences, I implemented leadership strategies to support Latina students who attend High School Equivalency and English as Second Language courses. This article explores the unique family constraints and addresses the need for identifying and overcoming cultural expectations and behaviors critical for the success of Latinas in Education. College personnel who may not be cognizant of the intricacies of the culture, cannot create an inclusive or equitable learning environment. Faced with an unwelcoming administration, students are hesitant to continue their education. I co-designed and established an educational support group to guide Latina students in developing skills for personal and academic growth to achieve their goals.

Keywords

Latina students, cultural constraints, leadership development, student empowerment

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